Welcome to Wakanda - Black Panther Inspired Designer Pieces

Welcome to Wakanda – Black Panther Inspired Designer Fashion

   Verve Fashion Magazine attended the Black Panther “Welcome to Wakanda” event during New York Fashion Week ahead of the film’s release primarily because of the designers showing at the event.

   But our focus has always been the intersection of fashion and beauty with the society as a whole.

  

   The designers showing who designed Wakanda-inspired outfits that would be auctioned off on CharityBuzz.com for the international humanitarian organization Save The Children, were:

Cushnie et Ochs

LaQuan Smith

Chromat

TOME

Ikire Jones

Sophie Theallet

 

With Capsule Collections created by:

Brother Vellies

Douriean Fletcher

Josh Bennett

 

   The fictional nation of Wakanda was styled by costume designer Ruth E. Carter. Carter based the look on research pulled from many different parts of Africa to create patterns, colors, beadwork and silhouettes of an “’Afro-Future’ idyllic concept with Wakanda and make it a world we had not seen before in cinema.” she says.

                                                                                                – Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Style Fashion Week Underground Fashion

NYFW AW18

Style Fashion Week – Underground Fashion

Chicago Playground   H33M   Shay Kawaii   Dertbag

Style Fashion Week is a producer of fashion events that landed in New York, but travels to Los Angeles, Palm Springs, Las Vegas, Miami and Dubai. Their overall goal is to produce events, with the participating designers as incidental to the shows.

At their Underground event, they featured Chicago Playground, Shay Kawaii (swimwear), H33M and Dertbag and was billed as a streetwear presentation.

The venue and presentation was impactful, but with an evening audience ready for a club setting, only the designers were serious about the showing.

Street Fashion holds a particular place in the apparel industry. Sold mostly through affordable and lower price point outlets, they are produced in the greatest quantity in the apparel business. They attempt to capture the
hearts, minds and attentions of the young and often, most impatient and
enigmatic of audiences.

But the phrases, thoughts and focuses of youth can be fiery, profane and provocative – all things that production corporations trying to gain the greatest sales volumes are trying to avoid.

Street fashion that avoids provocation, often has no place to go.
They will not get noticed or influencers or a point of view. Their buyers will be price-point shoppers influenced primarily by low prices.

Streetwear, like all fashion, still has a thread weaving through the line. Unravel, or John Elliot, Malatesta and Born Dead. Their strength is in either the style mix or graphics rather than sales.

– Phillip Wong –

Chicago Playground

H33M

Shay Kawaii

DertBag


NYFW AW18 Charles And Ron Fernando Alberto Domingo Zapata

NYFW AW18

Art Hearts Fashion

Charles and Ron    Fernando Alberto    Domingo Zapata

The Charles and Ron line is referred to as a “lifestyle” brand. Wearable, fluid, colorful, it reflects an Afro-Mediterranean sensibility of their Maltese origins. There is a distinct awareness of accessorizing their caftans, tunics and shifts with matching belts and handbags. While Malta is considered a part of Europe, it’s history and location has strong North African and Roman roots. Charles and Ron’s color combination are much closer in alignment in color to Africa and in design to the warmer climates of flowing, open garments in blocky shapes that are pulled into shape by their accessories.

Fernando Alberto is designs in Los Angeles, produces in Mexico and Spain and is a third generation fashion designer. Although he has a deep background in fashion, his designs, choice of textiles and prints ielegant, modern and bold at the same time. He has an understanding of how tmix boldness with subtlety, how to use complex prints in specific shapes anwhen not to.

His background is reflected through his prism of nuance and taste. There is bold, unapologetic sexiness coupled with diaphanous subtle statement. The choice of religious iconography printed on some the textiles is both referential to his style and a historical context.

Domingo Zapata isn’t a fashion designer, but his artistry has been on display globally and his association with the AIDS Healthcare Foundation gave a presentation of original graffiti-like work on naked bodies, pieces of clothing and a wide range of participants. In an overt reaction to the Trumpian call for nationalism and xenophobia, men in gowns, kids, men and women in underwear, a pregnant woman, people of all sexual preferences and gender
identification, all with inclusive messages painted by Zapata, were met with
standing ovations and cries of welcome and support.

-Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Art Hearts Fashion Candice Cuoco Danny Nguyen Willfredo Gerardo

NYFW AW18

Art Hearts Fashion

Candice Cuoco   Danny Nguyen   Willfredo Gerardo

   Candice Cuoco has shown globally and has appeared in television competitions. Her presentation is bold, provocative and assured. Using veils like Mardi Gras masks and she uses leather strapping and collars that have a fetish feel. But Cuoco’s sensibilities are complex, a liberal use of leather based pieces and printed fabric layers, with the floral suggestions of Aubrey Beardsley sketches or an Oscar Wilde tale, her work has an 1890s or 1980s cultured ennui.  While the apparel industry represents designers as unique individuals while trying to sell hundreds and thousands of units, Cuoco refers Betty Page, Patricia Field in a highly stylized line which demands attitude and assurance for a woman to wear.
Cuoco designs for blatant décor but always an underlying sexuality.

Danny Nguyen is bold, direct and distinctive. His mustache
reminds us of Salvador Dali, but his line has a stronger men’s side than women’s.
His women’s line uses body conforming pieces with beautiful flowing iridescent
fabrics to frame the figure. The men’s line uses a wider range of fabrications,
colors and textures on blazers, and trousers that radiate both elegance (which
can also be seen in his women’s line) and wit.

Willfredo Gerardo designs for mermaids. With
Hollywood-inspired form-fitting dresses in aquamarine exaggerated dropped
sleeves, flowing trails and plunging necklines, his work is made for runways
and red carpets. Coming from North
Hollywood, you can see references in his transparent body shapes, the workmanship of sequins, filigree and
iridescence, to Bob Mackie, and earlier, Adrian, Travis Banton and Edith
Head.

– Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Art Hearts Fashion Lily Marotto Eva Habashi A Modo Mio

NYAW18

Art Hearts Fashion

Lily Marotto   Eva Habashi   A Modo Mio

   Lily Marotto’s line, shown at Art Hearts group shows emphasized beautiful prints and custom printed fabrics. A wide range of themes featuring dancers and skaters, goddesses and varying exotic birds, the line suggests a complexity blending shape of each dress working with the artwork or print designated for that item.

Lily Marotto has lived and worked in Paris, London, Milan and New York, Her eclectic interests are reflected in the artists she collaborates with.

Egyptian designer Eva Habashi uses different items on a small line that has classic forms, but a mix of lace and tulle to create wider skirting, a softer, see-through feel and molded breastplates that create strong defined shapes and sometimes suggest Roman military forms. Some of the gowns and cocktail dresses have a traditional feel that contrasts.

A Modo Mio is a Colombian line designed by Francesca Sesana.
Her line is a mix of textures and layers with transparent skirts and overlaying jackets or tops. Every piece seems to show a combination of flamboyant street sense with daring laces, tulles or mesh layers. She uses floral patterns, camo, denim and leather jackets that establish boldness.

– Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Art Hearts Fashion

NYFW AW18

Art Hearts Fashion

Just as each designer approaches the design and fashion
industry (and their own businesses) differently, group showings are approached
by the show producers differently.

Some want to benefit the fashion industry (and industries that go along with it), while others just want to make money by having a show that they don’t have to pay for. The fact is, a fashion line launch can be astronomical for a small
designer. But it can also be an efficient way to introduce a line to press, and might be the only way a designer’s line can be seen.

Producers like Kelly Cutrone’s People’s Revolution and the Council of Aspiring American Fashion Designers (CAAFD), curate the work of designers and try to show lines that are distinctive, different and producible. Other designers showing with Art Hearts Fashion, The Society Fashion Week, and the Social Network’s Underground Fashion reach a combination of consumers and press.

Verve Fashion Magazine tries to see as much as possible to get new and emerging and transitional lines on our radar.

There are also questions of “What is Fashion?” and “What is Art?” and we’ll discuss that the same way The Food Network expanded the concept of food, diversity, differences and how they impacted the food industry. Food isn’t just packaged food in the frozen food section, but has expanded geometrically to encompass a wide variety of access points, distributions, taste and health interests, economic and grower’s limitations.

Our interest is in the highest of the high-end iconic design houses, but we are interested both in design and accessibility to a global market.

So our fashion looks is a mix of design and shill. This was our approach to group shows.

– Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Ruth Zabetta

NYFW AW18

Ruth Zabetta

  The CAAFD presentation finished with Ruth Zabetta Couture’s  line which also was a predominantly black and white showing. Zabetta uses strong angles: triangular constructions in collars, shoulder pieces or tops.

   The initial jacket with exaggerated shoulders surprises, followed by strong three-dimensional triangles on collars and as color accents. But most of Zabetta’s shapes suggest Japanese traditional kamishimos, kimonosor hakamas. Waist length jacket topswere belted with a rope, but other dresses follow the angular motif.

                                                                                                   – Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Mouton Blanc

NYFW AW18

CAAFD

Mouton Blanc

    The Council of Aspiring American Fashion Designers produced a group show of three designers: Mouton Blanc, Port Zienna and Ruth Zabetta.

Mouton Blanc is the line of Japanese designer Hayako Miya. There are elements of fantasy and strength in this dark layered collection. Miya works with lace, draping , texture and illusion. He creates pieces and combinations that obfuscates the face while allowing the eyes to see. It is reminiscent of Islamic burqas or Japanese ninjas.

   At the same time,the lace, with suggestive layers create an openness that belies either of those two suggestive cultural touchstones.

   While there is much that is fantastical in this collection (full length transparent lace dresses hiding the facial features), there is also a reality of lace layers with grey or black wool, plaids that are layered or mixed in skirts, hoodie jackets at hip length.

Length and weight of coats, jackets and skirts all vary in fabrication and texture.     

                                                                                                   -Phillip Wong –


Group Shows - Art Hearts, CAAFD, Style Fashion Week, The Society

NYFW AW18

Group Shows

Art Hearts Fashion / CAAFD / Style Fashion Week / The Society

   There were a number of group shows during New York Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 18. Some of the shows were simply taking advantage of the excitement of “fashion” coming to New York at a fixed time, but some group shows try to introduce new, emerging, or unknown designers to a larger audience.

 

Just as each designer approaches the design and fashion industry (and their own businesses) differently, group showings are approached by the show producers differently.

Some productions want to benefit the fashion industry (and industries that go along with it), while others just want to make money by having a show that they don’t have to pay for. The fact is, a fashion line launch can be astronomical for a small designer. But it can also be an efficient way to introduce a line to press, and might be the only way a designer’s line can be seen.

Producers like Kelly Cutrone’s People’s Revolution and the Council of Aspiring American Fashion Designers (CAAFD), curate the work of designers and try to show lines that are distinctive, different and producible. Other designers showing with Art Hearts Fashion, The Society Fashion Week, and the Social Network’s Underground Fashion, reach a combination of consumers and press.

Verve Fashion Magazine tries to see as much as possible to get new and emerging and transitional lines on our radar.

There are also questions of “What is Fashion?” and “What is Art?” and we’ll discuss that the same way The Food Network expanded the concept of food, diversity, differences and how they impacted the food industry. Food isn’t just packaged food in the frozen food section, but has expanded geometrically to encompass a wide variety of access points, distributions, taste and health interests, economic and grower’s limitations.

Our interest is in the highest of the high-end iconic design houses, but we are interested both in design and accessibility to a global market.

   So fashion looks can be mix of design and shill. Our approach to group shows was to see everything and sort it out later.                                – Phillip Wong –


NYFW AW18 Port Zienna

NYFW AW18

Port Zienna

   Port Zienna AW18 collection shows Francesca Canepa’s affinity for couture draping and shape manipulation. Each piece of a predominantly black and white showing played with straight lines, asymmetrical draping, or classical shapes.

While blacks, whites and shades in between focus on how blacks pieces rest in a white field, a sense of austerity continues with the simplicity of dresses, long coats in minimal pieces. While traditional couture draping suggests the gathering to emphasize the bodies shape, Canepa’s draping emphasizes a fluidity of movement beneath a simple fall of cloth.

– Phillip Wong –